David Pearce: Art and Diplomacy on Twitter

Watercolour of the Temple of Apollo, Corinth, by David Pearce

David D. Pearce served as U.S. ambassador to Greece from 2013 to 2016. In this guest post for Philhellenes, he explains how his work as a diplomat, his love of Greece, and his passion for painting all found expression through the medium of Twitter.

I always had the habit of drawing, but it was only about five years before getting to Greece in 2013 that I started the watercolors.

When I served as ambassador in Algeria 2008-2011, security restrictions severely limited weekend travel and outside activities. So in my free time, I began the methodical study of drawing, perspective, light, shade, and color. I also copied the works of painters I admired, especially Winslow Homer.

Painting quickly became my favorite pastime. I love the zen of it. I chose watercolor because it is a difficult medium, and I like a challenge. If you make a mistake in watercolor, you […]

Continue reading David Pearce: Art and Diplomacy on Twitter

Mezedes 1

A plate of mezedes

Traveller, writer, and soldier Patrick Leigh Fermor, who died in 2011, was an almost legendary figure among philhellenes. Writing in the TLS, James Campbell describes the experience of interviewing him back in 2004. (Read Campbell’s profile of Leigh Fermor.)

Why has Greece’s government debt continued to rise (from 130% of GDP in 2009 to 180% in 2016), despite years of austerity? Economist Jeromin Zettelmeyer explains.

Ethiopia and Greece have ties dating back to ancient times. Alice McCool writes about the small community of Ethio-Greeks keeping the cultural links alive today.

Koryvantes is a group of Greek history enthusiasts who research and reenact ancient Hellenic fighting skills and culture. Read about them and their work.

The Greek government has dropped a bill that would have required pet owners to neuter their animals or pay a levy.

Greece is currently home to many thousands of asylum seekers from the Middle East. […]

Continue reading Mezedes 1